Volume 10, No. 1

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Now, see what’s hot at the laundry.

Ty Acton, Editor









You Said It!

Marty Martin with MOD 72P

"We bought these 72P carts from MOD for the manufacturing quality - very impressive."

– Marty Martin, Executive Vice President, Apex Linen







Free Download!

Maxi-Press Membrane Literature

pdf packed with 112 pages of extractor press membrane knowledge plus replacement parts for tunnel washers, presses and dryers.






Corner Quotables

"If we had no winter, spring would not be so pleasant; if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome."
~ Charlotte Bronte

"Success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out."
~ Robert Collier

 

"Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
~ Mark Twain

 

Never iron a four-leaf clover - you don't want to press your luck.
~ Author unknown

Enjoy a favorite quote? Share it with Tingue Topics. Send it to tacton@tingue.com.

Coming Soon! Smooth Finish
Sneak Peek at cleaning and waxing guide in next Textile Services

By Ty Acton

If you look at your linens, they will show you how well your ironers are being cleaned and waxed. Here are some of the signs to look for that mean your ironers need more attention paid to cleaning and waxing.

WHY WAX?

The purpose is to keep the ironer chests lubricated and, as I’ve said for years, it should be done sparingly but often. Wax can be a powder, bead, paste or spray. It is placed onto the leading edge of a wax cloth, usually inside a pocket or barrier flap with a TeflonŽ or silicon coating.

Jared Addis of Tingue, Brown & Co.

Jared Addis of Tingue, Brown & Co. shows wax cloth to Steve Tillman, chief engineer, Boyd Gaming, Henderson, NV and Chris Cabrera, engineer.

When the wax cloth is fed through the ironer, the wax melts to coat and lubricate the ironer chests. This helps get even heating from the chests to the linens and makes feeding from one roll to the next much easier. If waxing isn’t done enough, or if it’s done without enough wax, areas on the ironer chests will become dry. These dry, dead spots can grab onto the linens. If your linens jam or come out of the ironer with accordion wrinkles, then run a wax cloth to clean and lubricate the chests. A wide variety of wax cloths is available for any type of ironer running any type of linens. But whichever cloth you use, it should be run through the ironer every two hours.

More about ironer cleaning and waxing here.

Click here to get our recommended Clean 'n Wax procedures as free pdfs in English and Spanish.



Latest Innovation
Clean and Wax Cloth
with Siliconized Flap

Danny Blandford

Danny Blandford of Tingue, Brown & Co. runs
TingueKleen Wax Cloth with Mike Darnell of
Clean Uniform Co., St. Louis MO

Offered exclusively from Tingue, Brown & Co., this flatwork ironer cloth combines cleaning and waxing in one, proprietary design. A nifty, siliconized flap in just the right position helps the wax melt and evenly disperse while handling very high temperatures.

It’s available in five different widths to fit every type of flatwork ironer.

For more on keeping ironers cleaned and lubricated, click here.



Meet Team Tingue – and our latest worker safety idea!
CSC Annual Convention Booth #416

CSC Network

Ty Acton and Matt VaccaAs a family-owned and operated company for 112 years, we take great pride in supporting the CSC Network of independently owned and operated launderers. Stop by our booth, meet your newsletter editor, Ty, and see our latest safety innovation. If you’re curious what it is or can’t wait for CSC, just give me a call - 800-829-3864.

How to become a CSC Member here.

List of Tingue reps with their cell phone numbers here.




Tingue Topics is published by Tingue, 535 N. Midland Ave., Saddle Brook, NJ. Copyright 2014.
May not be reprinted without permission. Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues.
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